Egg Foo Young (芙蓉蛋) the Chinese Stuffed Omelette

Tickle your tastebuds with this delicious Egg Foo Young.

Egg Foo Young (芙蓉蛋) is a Chinese Stuffed Omelette recipe that is made with eggs, shrimp, onion, garlic, carrots, bell peppers, bean sprouts, peas, and scallions, all mixed together with an oyster sauce and cooked until golden brown. Then it is served with a rich brown gravy.

What is Egg Foo Young?

In the Cantonese language, the name Egg Foo Young is derived from Fu Yung Egg Slices, a mainland Chinese recipe from Guangdong. This delicious dish is found in Chinese Cuisine, Indonesian Cuisine, British Chinese Cuisine, and Chinese American Cuisine.

In American omelets the egg is cooked in a pan then the filling is put on top of it and the egg is folded around the filling. However, in the Chinese stuffed omelet, the filling is mixed into the eggs before cooking. The egg foo young is then cooked until it’s golden brown, which some may consider “overcooked”.

Ways to make a Chinese Omelette

In China, they do not serve the Egg Foo Young with gravy, which is an American add-on. I personally like the gravy but some do not. The gravy is high in sodium so it’s not so healthy for you and won’t be good for your blood pressure.

Chinese Omelettes are always prepared with beaten eggs and most often made with various vegetables such as bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, sliced cabbage, spring onions, mushrooms, and water chestnuts. When meat is used as an ingredient, the usual choices are roast pork, shrimp, chicken, beef, or lobster.

How to Store Egg Foo Young

To be honest, I have never had any Egg Foo Young leftovers but you can store any leftovers in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days in an airtight container. Store the Egg Foo Young separately from the gravy.

You can freeze the omelet for up to 1 month and the gravy for up to 2 months.

History of Egg Foo Young

According to the New York Times, the Chinese Omelette origin story goes back to the southern Chinese coastal province of Guangdong, formerly known as Canton.

The Metropolitan City of Guangzhou 广州市, China

Guangzhou is a sprawling port city northwest of Hong Kong on the Pearl River.

Guangzhou’s isolation from the rest of ‘typical China’ by mountainous topography and early exposure to the outside world has resulted in its unique way of lifestyle, liberal ideas, distinctive cuisine, and tremendous wealth. It is no surprise that Guangzhou is a cradle of many reforms and revolutions that changed the face of China forever. Today Guangzhou still unveils many republic-era sights that help travelers understand modern Chinese history.

A Brief History of Guangzhou

Founded in 214 BC, this capital of the richest province is always a mix of new and old. It not only boasts some of the oldest temples in China, a millenarian-old park, an imperial tomb of a southern kingdom, and complete preservation of colonial villas and churches on Shamian, but it also serves as a showcase of futuristic architecture and autopilot metro on Zhujiang New Town.

Tourism in Guangzhou

The city features avant-garde architecture such as Zaha Hadid’s Guangzhou Opera House (known as the “double pebble”); the carved box-shaped Guangdong Museum; and the iconic Canton TV Tower skyscraper, resembling a thin hourglass. The Chen Clan Ancestral Hall, a temple complex from 1894, also houses the Guangdong Folk Arts Museum.

Despite its vibrant sight-seeing resources, travelers usually come to Guangzhou to shop and eat. Guangzhou accommodates countless huge markets specializing in almost any made-in-china products, including Chinese tea, herbs, garments, watches, electronics, and toys. You will be appalled to see the real prices of those China-made products and the profit your local shops earn by selling them.

As busy as it sounds, you can easily escape the crowd. Just head to surrounding villages, in which some of which date back to the Song Dynasty (960-1279AD). Bird watching in Nansha Wetland, a 200-hectare stopover for migrant birds from as far as Serbia, can easily make for a peaceful day.

Chinese Cuisine

Food is the centerpiece of life and Guangzhou has the country’s largest number of restaurants per capita, which is the birthplace of what you call ‘Chinese food’ (Cantonese food) in the west. Here you can grab the authentic taste of egg foo young, sweet & sour pork, wonton soup, and dim-sum. Few travelers can leave the city hungry.

Beiyuan Cuisine 北园酒家
202 Xiaobei Rd, Yuexiu District, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China

Beiyuan Cuisine
Beiyuan Cuisine

A national historical site in the heart of the city, this space faithfully depicts the details of a Lingnan-style Chinese garden. The interior is equally impressive, showcasing 14 gilded redwood vases with elaborate carvings on all sides. Opened in 1928, it is famed not only for its palatial décor but also for such Cantonese home-style dishes as Shaoxing drunken chicken or braised fish head with mushrooms, pork, and tofu.

How to Make this Egg Foo Young Recipe

This recipe is more complex than most egg omelet recipes and some of the ingredients may be a bit difficult to find. However, it is well worth the effort.

What You Need to Make Egg Foo Young

Equipment Needed

  • 1 Sauce Pan
  • 1 Mixing Bowl
  • 1 Spatula

For the Sauce

  • 1 ½ cups chicken broth
  • 1 ½ tbsp Chinese cooking wine aka Shaoxing wine, substitute Mirin or dry sherry
  • Pinch white pepper
  • ½ tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tsp white sugar
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 ½ tbsp corn starch

For the Chinese Omelette

  • vegetable oil, as needed to fry omelets
  • ½ cup yellow onion, diced small
  • 1 tsp garlic
  • ¼ lbs shrimp, cut up small (about 5–6 large shrimp peeled and de-veined)
  • ¼ cup carrots, diced small
  • ½ cup red bell pepper, cut up small
  • 8 eggs
  • 2 cups bean sprouts
  • 1 cup water chestnuts, sliced
  • 1 tsp oyster sauce
  • ¼ tsp white sugar
  • ¼ tsp white pepper
  • ½ cup peas, thawed
  • ½ tsp salt
  • green scallion, chopped for garnish

Time needed: 40 minutes.

How to Cook Egg Foo Young

  1. Make the Sauce

    Place chicken stock, sherry, white pepper, sesame oil, oyster sauce, vinegar, and sugar in a medium saucepan and heat. Mix corn starch with soy sauce in a small bowl and add to the pan and stir to combine and thicken. Once hot, remove from heat and hold for the end of the recipe.

  2. Prep the Wok

    In a seasoned wok over high heat, add a half cup of oil and once hot, swirl around to oil sides then remove all but two tablespoons of the oil. Reserve the remaining oil.

  3. Cook the Shrimp and Vegetables

    Once smoking hot, add the onion, garlic, shrimp, carrots, and red bell pepper all at once and cook and stir for about two minutes until the shrimp is cooked and starting to turn pink. Remove to a bowl or plate to cool. Turn off the heat.

  4. Beat the Eggs

    In a large bowl, beat eggs and add fresh bean sprouts, oyster sauce, sugar, BBQ pork, pepper, peas, and salt. Once the cooked ingredients are cool, add to the bowl. Stir to combine.

  5. Preheat the Oven

    Preheat the oven to 200 degrees to keep the omelets warm while you cook the entire batch.

  6. Cook the Egg Mix

    Using the same pan you cooked the vegetables, heat to between medium and medium-high. Once the pan is very hot, add about two tablespoons of the vegetable oil and once that is very hot, use a ¼ cup measure and scoop out a full ¼ cup of the mixture and pour it into the hot pan. The pan must be hot, and the omelets nice and browned when done, not mildly yellow like an omelet. As soon as you pour the mixture in, the sides will bubble up and puff in the hot oil and the bottom will brown. Once the center is set enough that you can safely flip, flip using your favorite spatula.

  7. Finish the Egg Mix

    Cook on the other side just long enough to set the egg then remove to a waiting oven-proof platter. Continue until all the mixture has been cooked into several omelets, using two tablespoons of oil between each omelet. If there is enough oil after each batch, you don’t need to keep adding more, just make sure that each omelet is cooked in at least two tablespoons of the oil.

  8. Top with Gravey and Serve

    Bring the sauce up to serving temperature and either serve on the side or pour over the omelets.
    Garnish with chopped green scallion tops.

Honestly, I think that the Chinese Omelette is by far the best omelet in the world.

If you liked this dish please Rate This Recipe and leave a comment.

Egg Foo Young (芙蓉蛋) the Chinese Stuffed Omelette

Egg Foo Young

Recipe Author | Captain Cook
This Egg Foo Young recipe will have your taste buds doing the happy dance. It is a Chinese stuffed omelet filled with shrimp and vegetables. Make it for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, this dish will be the highlight of the day.

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Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 40 mins
Cuisine Chinese
Servings 6 people
Calories 212 kcal

Ingredients
  

For the Sauce

For the Egg

Instructions
 

  • Place chicken stock, sherry, white pepper, sesame oil, oyster sauce, vinegar, and sugar in a medium saucepan and heat. Mix corn starch with soy sauce in a small bowl and add to the pan and stir to combine and thicken. Once hot, remove from heat and hold for the end of the recipe.
    1 ½ cups chicken broth, 1 ½ tbsp Chinese cooking wine, Pinch white pepper, ½ tsp sesame oil, 1 tbsp oyster sauce, 1 tsp rice vinegar, 1 tsp white sugar, 2 tbsp soy sauce, 1 ½ tbsp corn starch
  • In a seasoned wok over high heat, add a half cup of oil and once hot, swirl around to oil sides then remove all but two tablespoons of the oil. Reserve the remaining oil.
    vegetable oil
  • Once smoking hot, add the onion, garlic, shrimp, carrots, and red bell pepper all at once and cook and stir for about two minutes until shrimp is cooked and starting to turn pink. Remove to a bowl or plate to cool. Turn off heat.
    ½ cup yellow onion, 1 tsp garlic, ¼ lbs shrimp, ¼ cup carrot, ½ cup red bell pepper
  • In a large bowl, beat eggs and add fresh bean sprouts, water chessnuts, oyster sauce, sugar, pepper, peas, and salt. Once the cooked ingredients are cool, add to the bowl. Stir to combine.
    8 eggs, 2 cups bean sprouts, 1 cup water chestnuts, 1 tsp oyster sauce, ¼ tsp white sugar, ¼ tsp white pepper, ½ cup peas, ½ tsp salt
  • Preheat the oven to 200 degrees to keep the omelets warm while you cook the entire batch.
  • Using the same pan you cooked the vegetables, heat to between medium and medium-high. Once the pan is very hot, add about two tablespoons of the vegetable oil and once that is very hot, use a ¼ cup measure and scoop out a full ¼ cup of the mixture and pour it into the hot pan. The pan must be hot, and the omelets nice and browned when done, not mildly yellow like an omelet. As soon as you pour the mixture in, the sides will bubble up and puff in the hot oil and the bottom will brown. Once the center is set enough that you can safely flip, flip using your favorite spatula.
  • Cook on the other side just long enough to set the egg then remove to a waiting oven-proof platter. Continue until all the mixture has been cooked into several omelets, using two tablespoons of oil between each omelet. If there is enough oil after each batch, you don’t need to keep adding more, just make sure that each omelet is cooked in at least two tablespoons of the oil.
  • Bring the sauce up to serving temperature and either serve on the side or pour over the omelets.
  • Garnish with chopped green scallion tops.
    green scallion

Nutrition

Calories: 212kcalCarbohydrates: 19.8gProtein: 17.3gFat: 7.4gSaturated Fat: 2.1gCholesterol: 258mgSodium: 688mgPotassium: 450mgFiber: 1.1gSugar: 3.4gCalcium: 79mgIron: 2mg
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Recipes That Go Well With Egg Foo Young

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Thai Shrimp Cake – best Thai shrimp cake recipe loaded with shrimp, red curry, and served with sweet chili sauce. So good!
Check out this recipe
Thai Shrimp Cakes

Photo Credits:

  • By Taste The World Cookbook – Copyright 2022 All rights reserved.
  • By Beiyuan Cuisine – By http://www.beiyuancuisine.com/
  • By Zhou Manying – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=62948907
  • By Zhangzhugang – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29979769
  • By xiquinhosilva – https://www.flickr.com/photos/xiquinho/32894333162/in/photostream/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=86378721
  • By zengsx, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40896660
  • By Mr a – Own work, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20338813
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Captain Cook
Captain Cookhttps://notallwhowanderarelost.com/
If you strip away the labels and isms and meta tags, what are you left with? Are you strong and free enough as an individual to survive the loss of all those crutches and maintain reason and meaning? Can you use the power of thought and choice to walk the road of life?
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