Sonora-Style Hot Dog 🌭

Hotdogs are a global favorite, with each city boasting its own unique interpretation of this beloved dish


If you’re a fan of hot dogs, this Sonoran-Style Hot Dog is an absolute must-try. This traditional Mexican delicacy involves encasing a hot dog in bacon and grilling it until the bacon achieves a tantalizing crisp. It is then adorned with a fiery blend of corn, black beans, jalapenos, onions, and tomatoes. A dollop of fresh Mexican cream adds the final touch, transforming this into one delicious treat.

Creating the Perfect Sonoran-Style Hot Dog

This recipe presents a myriad of versions, but the enduring ingredient is always the bacon-wrapped hot dog. This delicious fare is known by a plethora of names including Mission Dog, Danger Dog, Francheezie, Texas Tommy, Hot Dog Estilo Hermosillo, Tijuana Dog, Dirty Dog, Border Dog, and even a variant referred to as the Jersey Breakfast Dog.

The Mission Dog, a San Francisco specialty, typically features grilled onions, mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and jalapeños as its core components.

Over in Los Angeles, the Danger Dog is a hit, served with grilled onions, bell peppers, ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, and grilled jalapeño peppers.

The Windy City, Chicago, offers a unique twist called the Francheezie, which is deep-fried and generously garnished with melted Cheddar or American cheese.

Philadelphia is the birthplace of the Texas Tommy, where the hot dog is cut open and stuffed with cheese, then wrapped in bacon. Cooking methods for the Texas Tommy vary, including deep-frying, broiling, or grilling.

Meanwhile, New Jersey boasts its own rendition known as the Jersey Breakfast Dog. This is a deep-fried hot dog covered with melted cheese and served atop a fried or scrambled egg.

Effective Techniques for Properly Storing Hot Dogs

Storing your Sonora-Style Hot Dog properly can ensure you savor its delicious flavors later. First and foremost, it’s important to let the hot dog cool completely before storing it. If it’s wrapped or contained while it’s still hot, it may cause condensation to form, which can lead to sogginess or even spoilage. Place the cooled hot dog in an airtight container to prevent any air from getting to it and drying it out. Plastic containers or reusable silicone bags work well for this. It’s also important to avoid squashing the hot dog, so be sure to use a container that’s the right size.

For short-term storage, you can keep the stored Sonora-Style Hot Dog in the refrigerator. Typically, the hot dog will stay good for up to three days if refrigerated. However, always use your best judgment and consider factors such as the freshness of the ingredients used. Always look for signs of spoilage like a sour smell or mold before reheating and consuming the hot dog.

If you’re thinking about longer-term storage, the freezer is your best bet. Before freezing, wrap the Sonora-Style Hot Dog securely in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, then place it into a freezer-safe bag or container. This double-layered protection will help to prevent freezer burn. The frozen hot dog can last for up to two to three months. To reheat, thaw the hot dog in the refrigerator overnight before warming it up in the oven or on a grill. Do remember to remove any plastic wrap before reheating.

Tracing the Roots: The Intriguing History of the Sonora-Style Hot Dog

The Sonora-Style Hot Dog, also known as the Sonoran Dog, is a vibrant and tasty representation of the cultural fusion between Mexico and the United States. As its name suggests, the hot dog originated in the northern state of Sonora, Mexico, specifically in the city of Hermosillo.

The culinary story of the Sonoran Dog began in the late 1980s. According to local lore, a man named Benjamin Galaz is credited with its invention. He was inspired by the American-style hot dogs sold at baseball games, and decided to create a version that incorporated traditional Mexican flavors. Thus, the Sonoran Dog was born, and it quickly became popular throughout Hermosillo.

The iconic dish eventually made its way north of the border into the United States in the 1990s, primarily in cities close to the US-Mexico border such as Tucson, Phoenix, and later Los Angeles. These dogs were initially sold out of ‘loncheras’ or food carts, mostly at night, quickly gaining popularity due to their unique and delectable blend of flavors.

Over the years, the Sonora-Style Hot Dog has undergone many transformations, with different regions adopting and adding their own unique touches. However, the heart of the dish — a bacon-wrapped hot dog nestled in a bun, adorned with a colorful array of toppings — remains unchanged.

Today, the Sonoran Dog is a beloved food item on both sides of the border, cherished for its blend of comfort food familiarity with the complex flavors of Mexican cuisine. It’s not only a testament to cross-cultural culinary innovation but also a delicious example of regional cuisine that’s enjoyed by many.

Exploring the Vibrant Metropolis of Hermosillo

Nestled in the northwestern state of Sonora, Mexico, resides the thriving capital city, Hermosillo. Originally known as Pitic, this bustling metropolis serves as Sonora’s largest city and its key economic hub, as well as a vital center for the region. With its teeming population exceeding 800,000 inhabitants, Hermosillo proudly stands as the 16th largest city in the entirety of Mexico.

The Mexican government touts Hermosillo as one of the top five most desirable cities to inhabit within Mexico. Boasting a cosmopolitan allure, the city’s economy is impressively diverse, fueled by a robust mix of industries including automotive, textiles, and electronics. In addition, Hermosillo holds a significant presence in the food and tourism sectors, further underscoring its vibrant economic landscape.

Journey Through Time: A History of Hermosillo

Hermosillo, the vibrant capital of the Mexican state of Sonora, boasts a rich history dating back thousands of years. Archaeological evidence from the San Dieguito Complex in the El Pinacate Zone suggests the region has been inhabited for over 10,000 years, with signs of agriculture dating back approximately 2,500 years. Prior to European contact, this area was the home of various indigenous groups, including the Seri, Tepoca, and Pima peoples.

Spanish colonists arrived in the region in the 16th century, but substantial European settlement did not occur until the 18th century. In 1700, Spanish colonist Antonio de Deza y Ulloa established a military outpost known as Presidio de Pitic, which was situated strategically near the Sonora River to provide protection against indigenous attacks. Over time, the outpost flourished due to its pivotal location connecting mining sites in the region.

In 1828, the town was renamed Hermosillo in honor of General Jose Maria Gonzalez de Hermosillo, a hero of Mexico’s War of Independence. By 1879, the growth and development of the town led to its official designation as a city by the state government.

Throughout the 20th century, Hermosillo witnessed significant expansion due to industrialization and the arrival of the railroad. Today, Hermosillo stands as a thriving economic hub with significant contributions to the automotive, electronics, and aerospace industries. Despite modernization, Hermosillo retains its historical charm, serving as a testament to its rich past and a vital city in Mexican history and culture.

Exploring Hermosillo’s Attractions

Hermosillo, a sparkling jewel in Mexico’s tourism scene, effortlessly blends its historical appeal with a modern charm. Its vibrant cultural tapestry, breathtaking landscapes, and comprehensive amenities provide an eclectic mix of experiences for tourists. Visitors can expect a wide range of attractions from historic sites, art displays, gourmet dining to a bustling nightlife that collectively shape Hermosillo’s unique appeal.

History aficionados would find the neo-gothic Cathedral of the Assumption, nestled in Hermosillo’s heart, an unmissable attraction. Other significant historical landmarks include the Government Palace, famed for its murals portraying Sonora’s past, and the Sonora Museum, a treasure trove of the region’s indigenous cultural history. The city’s varied shopping locales and local markets like Mercado Municipal offer an intimate glance into everyday life, complete with the chance to buy traditional crafts and taste local delicacies, such as the popular Sonora-Style Hot Dog.

The scenic grandeur of Hermosillo, encapsulated by the majestic Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range, is a major allure for tourists. A brief journey from the city takes one to the untouched beaches of the Gulf of California, ideal for both relaxation and aquatic adventures. Ecotourism is also flourishing, with popular destinations like the eco-friendly Parque La Sauceda and the Sonora Desert Museum. Be it history, food, nature, or culture, Hermosillo promises a diverse array of enriching experiences for every traveler.

Discovering Sonoran Gastronomy

Sonora’s cuisine is synonymous with its gastronomic distinctiveness, courtesy of its diverse ingredients and cooking styles that mirror its unique geographical location. Combining coastal, desert, and farming influences, Sonoran cooking traditions exhibit a sumptuous mix of flavours. The state’s exceptional beef is a nod to its long-standing cattle ranching tradition. Celebrated dishes like carne asada, a grilled beef usually accompanied by tortillas, salsa, and beans, and Sonoran-style beef birria, a slow-cooked festive stew, are culinary staples here.

Situated near the Sea of Cortez, Sonora is blessed with a bountiful supply of fresh seafood. Seafood lovers can relish grilled or spicy shrimp dishes and fish tacos, featuring beer-battered fish encased in soft corn tortillas with various toppings. Indigenous Yaqui and Mayo communities’ influence shines through traditional dishes based on corn, beans, and squash. Tamales, a local favourite composed of corn dough filled with meats or cheese and steamed in a corn husk, are emblematic of this native heritage.

The Sonoran Hot Dog, perhaps Sonora’s most recognized culinary gift to the world, exemplifies the region’s fusion of Mexican and American flavours. These bacon-wrapped hot dogs are grilled and lavishly adorned with a variety of condiments, served in a bolillo-style bun. In essence, Sonoran cuisine offers an unforgettable gastronomic voyage through Mexico’s northwest, deeply rooted in local produce, cultural legacy, and historical trade connections.

Nacho Hot Dogs
Los Viñedos, 83120 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico

Nacho Hot Dogs is a mobile hot dog stand in the city of Hermosillo. They sell all kinds of hot dogs including
a single dog, double dog, jumbo, chile-dog, cheese-dog, Philadelphia dog, and their specialty, “El Chipilon”.

Crafting the Perfect Sonora-Style Hot Dog: A Step-by-Step Recipe Guide

Level of Difficulty: Easy | Level of Experience: Beginner

Journeying to Hermosillo, Mexico, isn’t necessary to savor the delight of this delectable dish. Here, we provide a list of ingredients and step-by-step instructions to help you recreate your very own Sonora-Style Hot Dog at home. Buen provecho, mis amigos (enjoy your meal, my friends).

What You Need to Make a Sonora-Style Hot Dog

For the Pico de Gallo:

  • ¾ cup tomatoes, diced
  • ⅓ cup onion, diced
  • ⅓ cup corn
  • ⅓ cup black beans
  • 1 tbsp jalapeño, diced & seeded
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • 2 tbsp fresh cilantro chopped
  • 2 tsp lime juice
  • ½ tsp salt

Mexican Crema:

  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tbsp buttermilk
  • 1 tbsp lime juice

For the Hot Dogs:

  • 8 all-beef hot dogs
  • 8 strips bacon
  • 8 hot dog buns
  • 1 large ripe avocado, halved pitted & sliced

Time needed: 30 minutes

How to Cook the Sonora-Style Hot Dog

  1. Make the Mexican Crema

    Add heavy cream and buttermilk to a small bowl or glass jar. Stir together to combine. Cover tightly with plastic wrap or a lid and let sit in a warm spot for 12 to 24 hours. Add lime juice, salt, and mix until well combined.

  2. Make the Pico de Gallo

    Place tomatoes in a fine-mesh strainer set in a bowl, season with salt, and toss to combine. Let tomatoes sit for 10 to 15 minutes. Discard liquid, transfer tomatoes to a bowl, and add in onion, corn, black beans, cilantro, lime juice, and garlic; toss to combine. Season with salt to taste. Set aside.

  3. Make the Bacon Wrapped Hot Dogs

    Wrap a slice of bacon around each hot dog, spiraling the bacon down the length of the frank. Place hot dogs on the cool side of the grill or on a cast-iron griddle, cover, and cook until bacon has fully cooked and lightly browned 10 to 15 minutes.

  4. Assemble the Sonora-Style Hot Dog

    Place hot dog buns on the hot side of the grill or in a cast-iron griddle, cut side down, and cook until lightly toasted, about 30 seconds. Transfer to a serving platter, place a hot dog in each bun, and top with pico de gallo, avocado slices, and Mexican crema. Serve immediately.

I did not include the resting time for the Mexican crema in the recipe time. You will want to make it 12 to 24 hours in advance or buy it already made from the store.

If you liked this dish please Rate This Recipe and leave a comment.

Sonora-Style Hot Dog

Sonora-Style Hot Dog

Recipe Author | Captain Cook
A bacon-wrapped hot dog that is grilled until crispy, and then topped with a spicy mix of corn, black beans, jalapenos, onions, and tomatoes and smothered in fresh Mexican cream.

Please Rate this Recipe

Be the First to Rate This Recipe
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Resting Time 10 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Cuisine Mexican
Servings 8 servings
Calories 504 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
  

For the Pico de Gallo:

Mexican Crema

For the Hot Dogs:

Instructions
 

For the Pico de Gallo:

  • Place tomatoes in a fine-mesh strainer set in a bowl, season with salt and toss to combine. Let tomatoes sit for 10 to 15 minutes. Discard liquid, transfer tomatoes to a bowl, and add in onion, corn, black beans, cilantro, lime juice, and garlic; toss to combine. Season with salt to taste. Set aside.
    ¾ cup tomatoes, ⅓ cup yellow onion, ⅓ cup sweet corn, ⅓ cup black beans, 1 tbsp jalapeño pepper, 1 clove garlic, 2 tbsp dried cilantro, 2 tsp lime juice, ½ tsp salt

Mexican Crema

  • Add heavy cream and buttermilk to a small bowl or glass jar. Stir together to combine.
    1 cup heavy cream, 2 tbsp buttermilk
  • Cover tightly with plastic wrap or a lid and let sit in a warm spot for 12 to 24 hours.
  • Add lime juice, salt, and mix until well combined.
    1 tbsp lime juice

For the Hot Dogs:

  • Wrap a slice of bacon around each hot dog, spiraling the bacon down the length of frank. Place hot dogs on the cool side of the grill or in a cast-iron griddle, cover, and cook until bacon has fully cooked and lightly browned 10 to 15 minutes.
    8 strips bacon, 8 all-beef hot dogs
  • Place hot dog buns on the hot side of the grill or in a cast-iron griddle, cut side down, and cook until lightly toasted, about 30 seconds. Transfer to a serving platter, place a hot dog in each bun, and top with pico de gallo, avocado slices, and Mexican crema. Serve immediately.
    8 hot dog buns, 1 large avocados

Nutrition

Serving: 1Sonora Style Hot DogCalories: 504kcalCarbohydrates: 27.4gProtein: 19.9gFat: 31.8gSaturated Fat: 3.6gCholesterol: 21mgSodium: 670mgPotassium: 229mgFiber: 1.7gSugar: 4.1gCalcium: 85mgIron: 2mg
Did You Like This Recipe?Take a picture and mention us on Pintrest @TasteTheWorldCookbook or tag it with #tastetheworldcookbook! Don’t forget to subscribe to our email list for more recipes!

Other Recipes That Will Go Well With the Sonora-Style Hot Dog

Mexican Corn Salad
This Mexican Corn Salad is a delicious side dish made from grilled corn and loaded with black beans and a few other add-ins. The dressing is creamy and a little smoky, with just the right amount of zing from the lime juice.
Check out this recipe
Fresh Grilled Mexican Corn Salad
Mexican Yellow Rice Recipe
Mexican Yellow Rice makes a great side and has a big punch of flavor. Cooked with carrots and sweetpeas and spiced with turmeric, paprika, chili powder, red pepper flakes, and cilantro.
Check out this recipe
Mexican Yellow Rice Recipe

Photo Credits:

  • By Taste The World Cookbook – Copyright 2022 All rights reserved.
  • By Nacho Hot Dogs – Copyright BY https://www.facebook.com/Nacho-Hot-Dogs-120527661869361/
  • By Artotem from Here, There, and… – Plaza Bicentenario in HermosilloUploaded by PDTillman, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15596134
  • By SteveMX – Own work Mi Trabajo, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11232279
  • By Metamario – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=39926910
  • By gakusei 88 from Japan – Catedral de Hermosillo y Kiosko, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=90690582
  • By Danieltakaki at English Wikipedia – Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by Avemundi., GFDL, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3968316
  • By SZeltzer – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=74739201
  • By Mudwater – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49074613
  • By Alvis at English Wikibooks – Transferred from en.wikibooks to Commons by QuiteUnusual using CommonsHelper., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9738243
Sourcewikipedia
- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Recipe Rating




Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Captain Cook
Captain Cookhttps://notallwhowanderarelost.com/
If you strip away the labels and isms and meta tags, what are you left with? Are you strong and free enough as an individual to survive the loss of all those crutches and maintain reason and meaning? Can you use the power of thought and choice to walk the road of life?
- Advertisement -

Must Try

- Advertisement -

Legal Note

This site is owned and operated by Taste the World Cookbook LLC. TasteTheWorldCookbook.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com and using the Google AdSense program. This site also participates in other affiliate programs and is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies.

More Recipes Like This

- Advertisement -