Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned beef is a salt-cured beef brisket commonly cooked with cabbage in celebration of St. Patrick's Day.

For a traditional Irish meal on St. Patrick’s Day, you will need to make some Corned Beef and Cabbage. This tasty meal is made with corned beef, potatoes, carrots, and cabbage and is guaranteed to bring you the luck of the Irish.

Ways to Make Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage is the Irish-American variant of the Irish dish of Bacon and Cabbage. The dish consists of sliced back bacon boiled with cabbage and potatoes.

A New England Boiled Dinner, a traditional New England meal, is made with corned beef, cabbage, and one or more root vegetables, such as potatoes, rutabagas, parsnips, carrots, turnips, or onions.

Jiggs Dinner consists of corned beef, boiled together with potatoes, carrot, cabbage, turnip, and turnip or cabbage greens. Pease pudding and figgy duff are cooked in pudding bags immersed in the rich broth that the meat and vegetables create.

Corned Beef and Cabbage
Corned Beef and Cabbage

How to Store Corned Beef and Cabbage

Leftovers should be stored in an airtight container and refrigerated within 2 hours of cooking or reheating. Use leftover corned beef within 3 to 4 days or freeze it for up to 2 months.

History of Corned Beef

Although the exact origin of corned beef is unknown, it most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Evidence of its legacy is apparent in numerous cultures, including ancient Europe and the Middle East.

The word corn derives from Old English and is used to describe any small, hard particles or grains. In the case of corned beef, the word may refer to the coarse, granular salts and potassium nitrate used to cure the beef.

Irish corned beef was used and traded extensively from the 17th century to the mid-19th century. Shipped from the port of Cork, the British supplied its civilian population, British naval fleets, and North American armies with corned beef. The product was also traded to the French, who used it in their colonies in the Caribbean as sustenance for both the colonists and enslaved laborers.

1898 can of corned beef by Libby, McNeill & Libby of Chicago, Ill.
1898 can of corned beef by Libby, McNeill & Libby of Chicago, Ill.

The Metropolitan City of Cork, Ireland

Cork is the second-largest city in Ireland, located in the southwest of Ireland, in the province of Munster. The city center is an island positioned between two channels of the River Lee which meet downstream at the eastern end of the city center, where the quays and docks along the river lead outwards towards Lough Mahon and Cork Harbour, one of the largest natural harbors in the world.

The City of Cork, Ireland
The City of Cork, Ireland

A Brief History of Cork

Cork was originally a monastic settlement, reputedly founded by Saint Finbarr in the 6th century. Cork became (more) urbanized at some point between 915 and 922 when Norseman (Viking) settlers founded a trading port.

The city’s charter was granted by Prince John, as Lord of Ireland, in 1185 and it was once fully walled. It suffered a severe blow in 1349 when almost half the townspeople died of plague when the Black Death arrived in the town.

Since the nineteenth century, Cork had been a strongly Irish nationalist city, with widespread support for Irish Home Rule and the Irish Parliamentary Party, but from 1910 stood firmly behind William O’Brien’s dissident All-for-Ireland Party.

Tourism in Cork

Sitting proudly on an island in the middle of the River Lee, CorkÔÇÖs feelgood buzz surges through its hip coffee shops, vibrant art galleries, off-beat museums, and seriously good pubs. Despite being a city, thereÔÇÖs a decided towny feel.

Irish Cuisine in Cork

Cork has a historic food market, rich culinary traditions, and forward-thinking chefs means that Cork is at the top of its game when it comes to food.

O’Mahony Family Butchers
English Market, 35/36 Grand Parade, Centre, Cork, T12 W0DV, Ireland
Telephone: +353 21 427 0254

O'Mahonys Butchers´╗┐
O’Mahonys Butchers´╗┐

OÔÇÖMahonyÔÇÖs was started by Katherine OÔÇÖMahony in 1974. Since then her son Eoin and daughter Eimear have joined her behind the counter and become integral to the business. In addition to serving home cooks, they supply meat to 20 restaurants in Cork City.

How to Make This Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe

This corned beef and cabbage recipe is quick and easy to make. A no-fuss meal, that’s great for St. Patrick’s Day or just a weeknight family dinner. Chop up the leftover corned beef for corned beef hash tomorrow morning.

Corned Beef and Cabbage
Corned Beef and Cabbage

What You Need to Make Corned Beef and Cabbage

Equipment Needed:

  • 1

Ingredients Needed:

How to Cook Corned Beef and Cabbage

Time needed: 2 hours and 40 minutes

Cooking Directions for Corned Beef and Cabbage

  1. Cook the Corned Beef

    Place corned beef in a Dutch oven and cover with water. Add spice packet, cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until corned beef is just about fork-tender, about 2 hours.

  2. Prep the Vegetables

    While the corned beef is simmering, cut potatoes in half. Peel carrots and cut them into 3-inch pieces. Cut cabbage into small wedges.

  3. Add the Vegetables

    When corned beef has cooked for 2 hours, add potatoes and carrots; cook until vegetables are almost tender and meat is fork-tender, about 10 minutes. Add cabbage and cook until tender, about 15 more minutes.

  4. Slice and Serve

    Remove meat and let rest for 15 minutes. Leave broth and vegetables in the Dutch oven.
    Slice meat across the grain. Serve with vegetables and broth.

Condiments are likely to include mustard pickles, pickled beets, cranberry sauce, butter, and a thin gravy made from the cooking broth.

If you liked this dish please Rate This Recipe and leave a comment.

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Recipe Author | Captain Cook
Corned beef and cabbage is a complete meal made with tender corned beef, potatoes, sweet carrots, and cabbage. It's the perfect traditional Irish meal for St. Patrick's Day.

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Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours 30 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 40 minutes
Cuisine Irish
Servings 6 servings
Calories 869 kcal

Ingredients
  

Instructions
 

  • Place corned beef in a Dutch oven and cover with water. Add spice packet, cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until corned beef is just about fork-tender, about 2 hours.
    3 lbs corned beef brisket
  • While the corned beef is simmering, cut potatoes in half. Peel carrots and cut into 3-inch pieces. Cut cabbage into small wedges.
    10 small red potatoes, 5 med carrot, 1 lrg cabbage
  • When corned beef has cooked for 2 hours, add potatoes and carrots; cook until vegetables are almost tender and meat is fork-tender, about 10 minutes. Add cabbage and cook until tender, about 15 more minutes.
  • Remove meat and let rest for 15 minutes. Leave broth and vegetables in the Dutch oven.
  • Slice meat across the grain. Serve with vegetables and broth.

Nutrition

Calories: 869kcalCarbohydrates: 69.9gProtein: 49.6gFat: 41.3gSaturated Fat: 13.1gCholesterol: 147mgSodium: 3377.5mgPotassium: 2779.6mgFiber: 12gVitamin A: 268.4IU
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Other Recipes That Go Well With Corned Beef and Cabbage

Lyonnaise Potatoes
Fried potatoes with onions in butter and garlic. Do your tastebuds a favor and throw them a party of Lyonnaise Potatoes so they can do the happy dance.
Check out this recipe
Lyonnaise Potatoes

Photo Credits:

  • By Taste The World Cookbook ÔÇô Copyright 2022 All rights reserved.
  • By O’Mahony Family Butchers ÔÇô By https://www.facebook.com/omahonysbutchers/
  • By Microstar – File:Cancun Strand Luftbild (22143397586).jpg, por Dronepicr (CC-BY-2.0)File:Boulevard Kukulcan, Zona Hotelera, Canc├║n, Mexico – panoramio (34).jpg, por Panoramio upload bot (CC-BY-3.0)File:Gone to Lunch. – panoramio.jpg, por Panoramio upload bot (CC-BY-3.0)File:Yamiluum1.JPG, por Feliks~commonswiki (CC-BY-SA-3.0-migrated)File:El Rey Zona Arqueologica, Cancun, Mexico RFDZ1265.jpg, por Xe3osc (CC-BY-SA-3.0)File:Cancun Luftbild (22143391876).jpg, por Dronepicr (CC-BY-2.0)File:Canc├║n, Playa Caracol – panoramio.jpg, por Panoramio upload bot (CC-BY-3.0)File:Ferry Port in Cancun.jpg, por Nv8200pa (CC-BY-SA-4.0), CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=61626705
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Captain Cook
Captain Cookhttps://notallwhowanderarelost.com/
If you strip away the labels and isms and meta tags, what are you left with? Are you strong and free enough as an individual to survive the loss of all those crutches and maintain reason and meaning? Can you use the power of thought and choice to walk the road of life?
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